Craig Green: Remodelling Moncler’s soft image into sculpture

Moncler has started its revolution: Last March, the Alpine house unveiled a total overhaul in the way that it presents and designs its collections, thanks to a huge collaborative endeavor entitled “Moncler Genius”, which saw to the end of seasonal collections and introduced the system of collection “drops”. The house invited six designers, including Pierpaolo Piccioli, Simone Rocha, Palm Angels and Craig Green. The former being a young London newcomer who quickly seduced the fashion world with his first collection (not to mention moved even himself to tears at the 2015 reception), Green delved into Moncler’s archives, conceiving a collection in which extreme padding took center stage and feather became sculpture. Vogue.fr met with Craig Green to discuss Moncler, uniformity and advice to young designers.

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    Photo: 5 Moncler Craig Green collection, Moncler Genius The Next Chapter

    Why did you decide to work with Moncler? 

    The Genius collection for FW18 is the third collection I have designed for Moncler, building on from the Moncler C capsule collection. Protection and functionality are at the heart of Moncler’s heritage and are also something that I have always explored in my own work. I use similar ideas as the starting point for the Moncler collections, exploring their heritage whilst interpreting it in a way that aims to push those traditional ideas further.

    What do you think the label’s place in menswear is? 

    I think that the true success of any label, especially in menswear, is the ownership of a signature wardrobe classic, which is true for Moncler and the feather down jacket. Moncler has always been at the forefront in understanding the end consumer. The Genius project and its change in approach demonstrates that they are not afraid to adapt and react to the way that people are now approaching retail.

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    Photo: 5 Moncler Craig Green collection

    What’s one thing you discovered about Moncler that struck you?

    Working with Moncler’s development teams made me realize the level of specialist knowledge and expertise they have built. Feather down technology is a very specialist garment construction, with many limitations but also many possibilities, which combined, makes the process of developing a collection really exciting.

     You pushed your designs to the pinnacle of its conceptual nature with this collaboration with Moncler. What was your intention?

    I have always taken inspiration from protection and functionality. The Moncler FW18 collection was based around the idea of padded forms and exploring how protective clothing or devices can warp and obscure the body. Working with moderns and traditional versions of life vests, swimming aids, isolation tanks, spacesuits and life rafts, these shapes were then layered and built into garments, creating the final effect of an extreme full body protection.

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    Photo: 5 Moncler Craig Green collection, Moncler Genius The Next Chapter

    Why did you choose to design monochrome silhouettes in only black and white?

    The collection was about shape, form and silhouette, so I chose the most straightforward and purest way I could think of to demonstrate that idea.

     Besides their sublime sculptural aspect, what’s the message of your designs? 

    Uniforms, communal dressing, protection and functionality are all ideas that I consistently explored within my work. I have always been interested in clothing for function and exploring ideas surrounding groups and uniform.

    I see uniforms as a romantic idea, potentially due to the way that industry is developing to become more mechanized. Uniforms are also kind of forms of protection, the feeling that you belong or that you are a part of something.

    Do you have a piece of advice for young designers?

    I think the advice I would give is to stay true to what you believe in and to work hard, be there for every moment and never expect somebody to do something that you would not do yourself. Although, I also think sometimes that advice can be damaging and that not knowing is the beauty of being a young designer – the freedom to experiment and making mistakes.

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